anorexia

Eating Disorders -- RCC

The Allure of Eating Disorders: Perfection and Shame

Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia often provide individuals with a sense of purpose; as if they are on a mission to remake themselves and finally become happy. People suffering from an eating disorder may have that inner voice telling them they will be happy if they can just lose the weight. This same voice tells a person with anorexia or bulimia that their worth is primarily measured by how they physically look. (more…)

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What is anorexia?

Anorexia nervosa is a serious mental illness characterized by significant weight loss; difficulties maintaining appropriate body weight and, for some, body dysmorphia.  At any given time, anorexia nervosa will affect 0.3-0.4% of young women and 0.1% of young men, and it has the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. (more…)

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DNA Puzzle

The Link Between Genetics, Depression and Eating Disorders

The origin and development of eating disorders is a complex topic. In the past, misunderstandings about these disorders led many people to create false conclusions. Thankfully, newer research on how these ailments develop in an individual are slowly dispersing these misperceptions. These newer studies have even started to explore the connection between eating disorders like anorexia, depression and a person’s genetics.

The traditional stereotype for someone with an eating disorder was a younger, wealthier, Caucasian woman. However, this stereotype is not true. In fact, people from a wide-variety of backgrounds can, and do, suffer from eating disorders. Pushing beyond societal identifiers like race and income levels, researchers are now beginning to study the human genome in order to discover additional eating disorders indicators.

For conditions like anorexia nervosa, bulimia or binge eating; healthcare professionals still are not sure as to why some people develop eating disorders. However, there are well-documented risk factors that can increase an individual’s chances for developing an eating disorders. Studies have shown a strong correlation between the existence of depression and occurrence of an eating disorder. These disorders also commonly co-occur with anxiety disorders.

Major depressive disorder or clinical depression is one of the more common mood disorders. Similar to eating disorders, the symptoms of depression can affect how a person feels and thinks. Even activities such as sleeping, eating, or working are impacted. Clinical depression is more than feeling sad for a day. It is much longer and more severe. For example, for a behavioral health professional to make a diagnosis, the symptoms for major depressive disorder usually must be present for at least two weeks.

In one study, researchers sampled 2,400 individuals who were hospitalized for an eating disorder. Out of this sample group, researchers discovered that 92% of those in this group struggled with a depressive disorder. Discovering connections between these conditions has encouraged researchers to look at more recent large-scale genomic studies. Using genetics to explore the complexity of eating disorders is starting to produce clues as to the disease’s origins and why it is so persistence.

One of the first studies that was able to document a strong correlation between eating disorders and genetics was in 2017. The research, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, was able to identify a significant genetic marker for anorexia nervosa. The implication of this research suggests that health conditions like anorexia nervosa may both exist as a psychiatric and a metabolic disorder.

Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any eating disorder. Commonly referred to as anorexia, the disorder is characterized by extreme caloric restriction resulting in weight loss, an intense fear of gaining weight, and a distorted body image. Individuals with this condition sometimes go undiagnosed, but researchers estimate that roughly 2 percent of women and 0.3 percent of men suffer from this disease.

Researchers have found, by studying the genetic makeup of identical twins, that anorexia is 50 to 60 percent inheritable. Earlier genetic research has linked these same genomic regions to autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.

With the success of the Human Genome Project, which was completed in 2003; researchers can now study the impact of genetic code on a person’s health. The successful completion of the project gave scientist and physicians the ability, for the first time, to read the complete genetic code for building a human being. Currently, this DNA blueprint is used to research many other diseases and conditions. Hopefully, this new research will provide a better understanding as to why and how eating disorders develop, as well as offer additional treatment options.

Experienced Healthcare professionals can help individuals identify eating disorders, as well as provide safe and effective treatment options. For additional information or questions about eating disorder treatment options, please contact the staff at River Centre Clinic (RCC). Their Eating Disorders Programs provide a full range of treatment options for both adolescents and adults.

River Centre Clinic’s primary goal is to provide high quality, cost-effective, specialized care for patients with eating disorders in a state-of-the-art treatment environment. Our levels of care deemed most cost-effective for the majority of these patients is Partial Hospitalization for adults and Residential Treatment for adolescents. We also provide outpatient services for this patient population in order to facilitate transition to and from the above higher levels of care that are usually required for effective treatment of this population.

The EAT-26 (Eating Attitudes Test) assessment provides anonymous and quick feedback for a variety of eating-related health conditions.

Follow on Twitter:  @River_Centre

Genetics, Depression, Eating Disorders, Anorexia 

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Eating Disorders Among Minorities

When the term eating disorder is mentioned, there is usually a specific mental image that comes to mind. Traditionally, the stereotypical person with this type of mental health issue is a young, wealthier Caucasian female. Mass media and pop culture images usually reinforce the portrayal of hyper-thin, white women who are suffering from the effects of conditions like anorexia nervosa. However, this stereotype that eating disorders only inflect younger, white women is not correct.

Eating disorders are usually placed into four overall categories: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED). Other mental health issues are also commonly assisted with these eating disorders such as general anxiety, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), depression, bipolar disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

The American Psychiatric Association defines an eating disorder as an illness where people experience severe disturbances in their eating behaviors. They also have problems related to the regulation of thoughts and emotions, usually becoming obsessed with food consumption and their body weight. The prevalence of reported eating disorders, with the exception of anorexia nervosa, is similar among Non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanics, African-Americans, and Asian Americans in the United States.

Decades ago, American societal portrayals of eating disorders were almost always shown as a white-woman problem. Shockingly, this misconception was also maintained by physicians and other healthcare professionals.

For example, behavioral health research from 2006 challenged the notion that African-American women were less likely to develop eating disorders. In this study, healthcare providers read 1 of 3 passages describing disturbed eating patterns of a fictional patient named Mary. The only differences between the passages were that the patient’s race, which was randomly changed for each provider. This meant that every fictional patient’s symptoms were identical, with only the person’s race randomly rotating between African-American, Caucasian, or Hispanic.

Healthcare professionals were then asked to diagnosis the patient’s level of depression, anxiety as well as whether an eating disorder might exist. In cases of a white racial profile, the eating behavior was considered problematic 44% of the time. For Hispanic profiles, the behavior was considered problematic in 41% of the cases. Surprisingly, when the patient was identified as African American, the eating behavior was identified as problematic in only 17% of the cases. The study’s final results suggested that healthcare clinicians appear to hold race-based stereotypes about eating disorders that could limit their detection of symptoms in African-American girls.

The results of the 2006 study reinforced earlier research from 2002 which found that the race of adolescent girls had a significant impact on the detection of disturbed eating patterns. In this study, undergraduate college students recognized the existence of an eating disorder more often when they read about a Caucasian female, rather than when they read about a minority female (Hispanic or African American) with the same behavior.

National statistics indicate that eating disorders predominantly occur in white females, but many eating disorder professionals increasingly believe that the data is skewed. Women of color have likely been alienated from personal support networks. In addition, healthcare professionals use to believe that African-American and Hispanic women were somehow more immune to eating disorders.

Until recently, people with an African American racial identify were underrepresented in treatment centers and research studies about eating disorders. Gathering quality data was more of a challenge due to societal misperceptions and prejudice. Now it is clear that perceptions of body image and disordered eating patterns are not just problems for young, white women.

Here is some additional information on eating disorders and minorities:

It is clear that eating disorders do not only occur in certain racial or socioeconomic groups. Race, ethnicity and/or socioeconomic status does not make individuals immune to these health conditions. In the past, eating disorders were primarily associated with heterosexual, young, white females. In fact, these mental health issues affect people from all demographics and ethnicities at similar rates. However, minority groups (particularly African Americans) are significantly less likely to receive help for eating disorder problems.

Regardless of one’s racial or ethnic identity, treating and recovering from an eating disorder takes time as well as professional help. An experienced mental health professional can help a person understand the origins of this behavior, whether it is an eating disorder as well as acquire coping skills.

For additional information or questions about this topic, please contact the staff at River Centre Clinic (RCC). Their Eating Disorders Programs provide a full range of treatment options for both adolescents and adults. The River Centre Clinic’s main phone number is 1.877.212.5457.

Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)

The EAT-26 is the most widely cited standardized self-report screening measure that may be able to help you determine if you have an eating disorder that needs professional attention. Take the EAT-26 now and get immediate and anonymous feedback.

Follow us on Twitter:  @River_Centre

Eating Disorders, Minorities

Contributor: ABCS RCM

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Orthorexia Nervosa versus Anorexia Nervosa?

Anorexia nervosa is a well-known eating disorder that afflicts both women and men. The disease creates an extreme fear of weight gain in people who suffer from it. Symptoms include not eating, binge eating and purging, also known as bulimia. However, there is a lesser known eating disorder that shares similarities to anorexia, but is still different. This disorder is known as orthorexia nervosa and was first described in 1998.

Orthorexia means an obsession with proper or healthy eating. Having a concern with the nutritional quality of the food is a healthy behavior, but problems occur when this concern becomes excessive, damaging and disruptive. Individuals with orthorexia become so fixated on what they perceive as healthy eating that they actually damage their own physical and emotional well-being.

Is Orthorexia Nervosa the same as Anorexia Nervosa?

Many of the symptoms and behaviors surrounding orthorexia tend to overlap with anorexia. Yet, in cases of anorexia, people tend to focus more on severely restricting the quantity of food (calorie count). There is a clear and forceful desire to not gain weight. This, in turn, creates behavior that focuses on excessive exercising in order to lose unwanted weight. However, these are separate inflictions.

Since orthorexia is a newer diagnosis, it still possesses varying levels of acceptance among eating disorder treatment professionals. Some eating disorder specialists regard orthorexia as a discrete diagnosis like anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. There are reports that signs of orthorexia are perhaps increasing due to the use of social media to popularize extreme diets and other food-related behavior. Other health professionals, believe that patients with orthorexia symptoms are actually suffering from anorexia nervosa. The symptoms for orthorexia and anorexia have similarities such as:

  • A desire to maintain control of life by severely controlling daily food consumption.
  • Seeking self-esteem and fulfillment through controlling food intake.
  • Citing undiagnosed food allergies as a rationale for avoiding food.
  • Co-occurring disorders such as OCD or obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.
  • Elaborate rituals about food that may result in social isolation

What Is Orthorexia Nervosa?

There are still very few studies on the Orthorexia, but theories suggest that it is based on anxiety and/or depression much like other eating disorders. It is for this reason that the occurrence of orthorexia is typically accompanied by other eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, or binge eating disorder (BED). Which means a person’s orthorexia can co-exist with a bulimia disorder. This means an individual could binge on seemingly healthy foods (vegetables) and then purge the food in order to get rid of the calories.

Unlike bulimia though, people with orthorexia can hide their disease by displaying their symptoms in plain sight. At initial glance, people suffering from orthorexia appear to be simply taking care of their physical body. Individuals with orthorexia may even talk about how they are about their eating habits. But, this healthiness is an illusion. There is a difference between conscious, healthy eating and having orthorexia nervosa. Orthorexia is similar to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), in the fact that people must create rules and engage in specific rituals around food.

Some trendy or extreme diets can trigger behavior that resembles orthorexia. However, simply adopting an alternative diet, whether based on science or pseudoscience, does not mean someone has orthorexia. For example, some people adopt a trendy diet that restricts certain food groups: Vegan, gluten-free, Paleo diets, etc. The adoption of these diets does not automatically create an orthorexia diagnosis.

Orthorexia turns eating into a pathological activity that becomes entangled with obsessive thinking, compulsive and ritualistic behavior and self-punishment. Individuals with orthorexia often use a diet to achieve a feeling of perfection, purity or superiority. They may feel judgmental towards people who do not follow their perfect, healthful diet. This means they often spend excessive amounts of time planning and researching “pure” foods, which interferes with participation in normal social activities and interactions. These symptoms are what turns a trendy diet into orthorexia nervosa.

How are Orthorexia Nervosa and Anorexia Nervosa Different?

Obsession with weight is one of the primary signs of anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders. But this is not a symptom of orthorexia. Instead, the focus for people with orthorexia is an excessive obsession with the health implications of their dietary choices.

People with anorexia will severely restrict their food intake in order to lose weight. People with orthorexia, however, strive to feel pure, healthy and natural. The focus is on quality of foods consumed instead of the quantity. In the end, it is critical that people with eating disorder signs and symptoms seek appropriate clinical advice from a professional with experience treating orthorexia, anorexia as well as other conditions. The obsessive tendencies associated with orthorexia can indicate a co-occurring disorder that should be diagnosed and treated by a psychiatrist.

There are definite similarities as well as differences between anorexia and orthorexia. Both of these eating disorders tend to provide a sense of control and stability around the consumption of food. Again, both eating disorders are dangerous mental illnesses that require professional treatment from a skilled clinician.

For additional information or questions about anorexia and orthorexia, please contact the experienced staff at River Centre Clinic (RCC). Their Eating Disorders Programs provide a full range of treatment options for both adolescents and adults. The clinic is located in a modern, spacious and tranquil setting in Sylvania, Ohio.

Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)

The EAT-26 is the most widely cited standardized self-report screening measure that may be able to help you determine if you have an eating disorder that needs professional attention. Take the EAT-26 now and get immediate and anonymous feedback.

Follow on Twitter:  @River_Centre

Orthorexia Nervosa, Anorexia Nervosa,

Contributor: ABCS RCM

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Social Media and Orthorexia

Social media’s pervasiveness throughout society is well-established. Individuals from a variety of backgrounds read and actively use some type of social media channel. The mass adoption of this new communication form is starting to generate questions and concerns. One of these questions ask as to whether the use of social media makes people more susceptible to developing an eating disorder? A new study suggests that specific social media channels might actually lead to unhealthy obsessions with healthy eating.

Incidents of depression have been linked to heavy social media use. For example, there is an increasing amount of evidence that connects the amount of time spent on Facebook with the occurrence of depression. Other studies have also suggested that the extensive use of social media by young adults has a negative impact on body image, depression, social comparison, and disordered eating. Beyond these negatives, social media sites that offer the newest superfood or latest diet fad may be just as damaging. Studies are beginning to see a correlation between disordered eating – particularly orthorexia, or an obsession with eating healthy foods that can lead to unhealthy consequences like nutrient deficiencies, social isolation and anxiety.

Although not formally recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, awareness about orthorexia is on the rise. Being concerned with the nutritional quality of the food is not a problem and is actually a good habit to develop. However, individuals with orthorexia become so fixated on what is considered healthy eating that they actually start to damage their own well-being. Studies have shown that many individuals with orthorexia also have obsessive-compulsive disorder. High orthorexia nervosa prevalence has been found in populations who take an active interest in their health and body and is frequently comorbid with anorexia nervosa. In particular, there seems to be a link between Instagram users and signs of orthorexia symptoms.

In 2017, a study in Eating and Weight Disorders found that out of the population studied, 49 percent of people who followed health food accounts on Instagram had symptoms of orthorexia. By contrast, less than 1 percent of the general population has the “condition,” which, by the way, isn’t an official diagnosis or classified eating disorder. The correlation between Instagram users and the increased symptoms of orthorexia nervosa is surprising. Especially, due to the fact that higher Instagram use was associated with a greater tendency towards orthorexia, but no other social media channels had this effect. Additional analysis indicated that Twitter showed a small positive association with orthorexia symptoms. Other features such as Body mass index (BMI) and age had no association with orthorexia. As a reminder, the prevalence of orthorexia nervosa among the study population was 49 percent, which is substantially higher than the general population which is less than 1 percent.

Understandably, people use social media to discover healthy eating tips or to stay accountable to a fitness plan. But the pursuit of nutritious eating can become an unhealthy preoccupation. The pursuit of the perfect diet can lead to self-punishment and interfere with social activities. Eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors do not discriminate; they can affect women, men, girls and boys. For some people, especially women, healthy eating becomes practically synonymous with deprivation. This means that the typical warning signs for eating disorders, distressing thoughts, compulsive behaviors and self-created rules around food, often go unnoticed or are even praised. This is despite the fact that restrictive diets are sometimes precursors to clinical eating disorders. According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), food inflexibility can lead to guilt or self-loathing if a “bad” food is consumed, as well as anxiety about food planning and isolation from social events with food and drinks.

The signs of orthorexia include compulsively checking nutrition labels, an inability to eat any food that is not designated pure, obsessively following healthy lifestyle bloggers or social media figures, and showing an unusual interest in what kind of food others are eating. Naturally, people can read nutrition labels and follow fitness experts on Instagram without being orthorexic. But, when the action becomes compulsive and obsessive, this may indicate something beyond following a healthy food plan is occurring. Does the individual feel required to check labels, perhaps even multiple times, even though they have purchased this item in the past and already know the nutritional content? When eating food, does the person feel anxious about eating in general? These are perhaps symptoms of an eating disorder like orthorexia. If untreated, orthorexia can lead to anorexia nervosa, since eating disorders are rooted in compulsivity and obsession surrounding food. According to NEDA, orthorexia is characterized by being consumed with good vs. bad or healthy vs. unhealthy food, while anorexia is characterized by obsessive caloric restriction and weight loss.

Orthorexia is not yet officially recognized by the DSM-5. However, Healthcare practitioners skilled at recognizing eating disorders will know the signs of orthorexia and can connect patients with the appropriate therapists and medical doctors. Doctors and therapists who specialize in eating disorders and mental health, such as those at the River Centre Clinic (RCC) in Ohio, are aware of orthorexia’s prevalence and risks. For additional questions about this topic or other behavioral health issues – please contact us.

 

Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)

The EAT-26 is the most widely cited standardized self-report screening measure that may be able to help you determine if you have an eating disorder that needs professional attention. Take the EAT-26 now and get immediate and anonymous feedback.

Follow us on Twitter:  @River_Centre

 

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Eating disorders: From Pop Stars to Everyday People

From famous entertainers to the average person on the street, eating disorders are the silent battle that many people fight alone. Recently, pop stars like Demi Lovato and Kesha have both disclosed their struggles with eating disorders. Lovato told Insider that she is open about the challenges she faces with weight control and maintaining a positive body image. In a recent article in Cosmopolitan, Kesha shared a similar story but spoke of her success with overcoming body issues. However, there are numerous other people who do not have the spotlight of a pop star to share their pain and triumphs. They are not as well-known, but their everyday struggles with eating disorders are just as real.

Currently, there are over 30 million people who suffer from some type of eating disorder. There are still stigmas around mental illness, and this is true for eating disorders. Whether in Michigan, Iowa, or Ohio; the stories are very similar. These are stories of individuals confronting the pain of this affliction. In a story from Michigan, one woman reflects back on high school and remembers feeling proud that she “hadn’t eaten anything that day.” Eventually, she realized that something had to change. A mother in Iowa shares a similar story about her battles with and recovering from anorexia. “Eating disorders are a lot about control, and there was a lot in my life that was out of control. This was something I could control. And I grew up feeling like I wasn’t good enough or really worthy.”

In Ohio, an anorexia survivor has even created a short film that documents the doubt and isolation that is part of this mental illness. In this instance, the individual who has struggled with anorexia is a male, even though the disease is mistakenly thought of as a women’s disorder. He remembers thinking that “I could never tell people what I was going through because they never would believe me, or maybe it wasn’t even real.” His short film is intended to raise awareness and remind people that they are not alone and help is available. Recovery is possible. On a side note, males make up about 25 percent of eating disorder diagnoses.

Across the nation, eating disorders plague a wide variety of people. Yet, treatment options are available that can bring hope to those who are suffering in silence. For additional information, or if you have questions about eating disorders and recovery solutions, please contact the staff at River Centre Clinic (RCC). With decades of experience, their Eating Disorders Programs provide a full range of treatment options for adolescents and adults with a primary diagnosis of an eating disorder. The levels of care provided at the RCC are designed to meet the needs of most patients with eating disorders, but it is important to note that treatment is individualized for each case. We follow a well-established therapy model for treating eating disorders that integrates individual, group, and family therapy. The River Centre Clinic is located in a modern, spacious and tranquil setting in Sylvania, Ohio.

Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)

The EAT-26 is the most widely cited standardized self-report screening measure that may be able to help you determine if you have an eating disorder that needs professional attention. Take the EAT-26 now and get immediate and anonymous feedback.

Follow us on Twitter:  @River_Centre

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