Can Yoga Treat Eating Disorders?

Outside Yoga Class (River Centre Clinic)

Can Yoga Treat Eating Disorders?

Yoga, Eating Disorders,

Are there links between body image, physical activity and eating disorders? Stories and research from decades ago have shown that competitive sports can encourage the development of eating disorders. In the 1990s, Sports Illustrated articles openly discussed the deadly impact of anorexia on women athletes. Yet, roughly twenty years later, this problem still exists in U.S. culture. As of 2011, according to the Huffington Post and the National Eating Disorder Association, approximately 33 percent of male athletes are affected by eating disorders who participate in aesthetic sports and weight-class sports. But what if some physical activities actually decreased the occurrence or actually provided effective treatment for eating disorders?

Newer research is studying whether certain physical activities such as yoga, provide effective treatment for eating disorder related illnesses. Yoga, originally a Hindu spiritual and ascetic discipline from India, as an activity is increasingly popular around the world. Yoga is popular in the United States as a hobby that promotes health and relaxation. The activity incorporates movement, body postures, breath control as well as meditation. The popularity of yoga has raised questions as to whether different styles of yoga can provide complementary therapy for patients who are receiving treatment for eating disorders.

A randomized controlled clinical trial study in 2009 attempted to discover what effects individualized yoga practice had on adolescent patients. These individuals were receiving outpatient treatment for diagnosed eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder not otherwise specified). In this randomized study, out of 50 girls and 4 boys, the group that was participating in yoga experienced a greater decrease in eating disorders. The participates who were receiving non-yoga activities showed some initial decline, but then returned to baseline levels after 12 weeks. In this study, the yoga treatment did not have a negative effect on BMI, but the overall therapeutic approach was seen as holding promise as an adjunctive therapy to standard care.

Research in 2016 also asked the question as to whether the practice of yoga provided positive results in an outpatient setting. Specifically, in treating anxiety, depression and body image disturbances among adolescents with eating disorders. In this study, researchers concluded that outpatients eating disorder therapies combined with yoga practice showed decrease levels of anxiety, depression, and body image disturbances. Like the earlier 2009 study, the practice of yoga was seen as a beneficial treatment strategy when blended with multidisciplinary care. However, researchers did add that further study was needed on treatments approaches that presented yoga as a standard element of outpatient eating disorder therapy.

More recent studies from 2018 are continuing to research the application of yoga as a treatment strategy.  A small randomized control trial investigated the impact of an 11- week yoga program for women who were diagnosed with bulimia nervosa or other not specified eating disorders. Interestingly, this small study found that the women experienced benefits from yoga for months after the original research. A more detailed and larger study is planned in collaboration with the University of Buffalo. Like earlier research, this study will document the impact of regular yoga practice as a viable eating disorder treatment. Researchers in this study did note that examining eating disorders is challenging due to the fact that most yoga-eating disorder studies have few participants, short duration window as well as other design challenges. This two-year study will provide eating disorder researchers with an opportunity to collect data on an established, manualized yoga program that serves hundreds of individuals in community, educational and medical settings.

For additional questions about the use of yoga practice to supplement the treatment of eating disorders, please contact the staff at River Centre Clinic. The clinic’s mission is to provide specialized and cost-effective treatment for individuals suffering from eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and other eating disorders). An innovative approach to treatment is designed to reduce costs without compromising a high quality of care. They follow a well-established therapy model for treating eating disorders that integrates individual, group, and family therapy. For real-time feedback, their EAT-26 (Eating Attitudes Test) assessment provides anonymous and instant feedback about a variety of eating-related health conditions.

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Yoga, Eating Disorders

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