Tag - Anorexia

What is anorexia?

Anorexia nervosa is a serious mental illness characterized by significant weight loss; difficulties maintaining appropriate body weight and, for some, body dysmorphia.  At any given time, anorexia nervosa will affect 0.3-0.4% of young women and 0.1% of young men, and it has the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition states the following are present in all diagnosed cases of anorexia nervosa:

  • Restriction of energy intake, resulting in significantly low body weight
  • Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat (despite having a significantly low body weight)
  • Disturbance in the experience of body weight or shape; undue influence of weight or shape on self-evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of low body weight

Although all criteria from the DSM-5 may not be met, a serious eating disorder may still be present.

Signs and Symptoms of Anorexia Nervosa

You cannot tell if someone is struggling with anorexia just by looking at them; individuals do not need to be underweight or emaciated to have the disorder. Symptoms of anorexia nervosa vary on the length and severity of the disorder, and may include the following:

  • Weight loss (significant or sudden)
  • Preoccupation with weight, body, food, calories, fat grams, exercise and/or dieting
  • Refusal to eat certain foods or food groups
  • Complaints of constipation, abdominal pain, cold intolerance, lethargy, and/or excess energy
  • Distorted self-image
  • Expressed anxiety about gaining weight or being “fat”
  • Denial of hunger
  • Development of food rituals (e.g. eating foods in certain orders, excessive chewing, rearranging food on a plate)
  • Avoidance of meals as well as other situations involving food
  • Participation in an excessive, rigid exercise regimen
  • Engage in compensatory behaviors (subjective bingeing, purging, laxatives, exercise)
  • Withdrawal from friends, family and/or activities
  • Increased irritability
  • Concern about eating in public
  • Limited insight into and/or denial of the above mentioned unhealthy behavioral or cognitive patterns
  • Primary amenorrhea (failure to start menstrual cycle)
  • Secondary amenorrhea (loss of period) or has irregular periods
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Dizziness
  • Dental issues, such as enamel erosion, cavities, and tooth sensitivity

Health Consequences of Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia can seriously damage your body, as it takes a greater physical toll than most other mental health conditions. Some of the physical consequences can appear:

  • Slow heart rate and low blood pressure; the risk for heart failure increases, as heart rate and blood pressure decrease
  • Reduction of bone density (dry, brittle bones); the risk for osteoporosis/osteopenia increases as bone density decreases
  • Muscle loss and weakness
  • Dehydration (which can result in kidney failure)
  • Fainting, fatigue, and overall weakness
  • Dry hair and skin, hair loss
  • Growth of a downy layer of hair (lanugo) all over the body, including the face, to keep the body warm

 How We Treat

Anorexia can be severe, and even deadly. Without treatment between 5-20% of individuals with anorexia will die from the condition, with treatment the number decreases to 2-3%.  At the River Centre Clinic, we provide an individualized treatment plan designed to meet the specific needs of each client.

Clinical treatment approaches include:

  • Enhanced Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
  • Individual Therapy
  • Group Therapy
  • Family Therapy
  • Nutritional Rehabilitation
  • Medical and Medication Services

Our highly skilled interdisciplinary team members work closely with clients to design a treatment plan based on the initial assessment and then apply that plan within the framework of evidence-based treatment principles. Clients play a vital role in helping set realistic treatment goals that will help them address the underlying issues of their eating disorder.

Anorexia Treatment at River Centre

You are not alone in your eating disorder; River Centre is here for you. If you or a loved one would like more information about our treatment of anorexia in our programs, call us today at 866.915.8577 or complete our contact form.  Our admissions team is here to assist you.

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Eating Disorders -- RCC

The Allure of Eating Disorders: Perfection and Shame

Some people may find this surprising, but eating disorders like anorexia nervosa and bulimia can provide individuals with a sense of purpose. They are on a mission to remake themselves and finally become happy. People suffering from an eating disorder will have an inner voice that tells them that they will be happy if they can just lose the weight. This same voice tells a person with anorexia or bulimia that their worth is primarily measured by how they physically look.

People suffering from diseases like anorexia may actually have a sense of uniqueness. As they grapple with hunger pains and thoughts that excessively focus on food, exercise and their body. They become numb to other things in their life. Eating disorders can create an anesthetic-like effect on people. When their body is perfect, they will be happy. There is simply no escape from this mission.

However, this is an illusion. For people, happiness and positive self-esteem arise from accepting and loving themselves as they are in the present. Another crucial piece for a successful recovery is for individuals to have access to love and support. In this way, people can start to understand that their eating disorder was not by choice. Yet, seeking treatment is not always an option for some people. Sadly, there is still a societal stigma towards mental health.

Due to this stigma, and feelings of shame, people may choose to struggle with their eating disorder alone. However, they should understand that there is no shame in having a diagnosed eating disorder. Perceived feelings of shame for having an eating disorder is a poor reason for not seeking professional help. But, these feelings of shame and fear create additional medical complications and high mortality rates for individuals struggling with an eating disorder.

Among the youth and college students, eating disorders are particularly a problem. There is a movement to educate students, as well as the youth in general, about body positivity and the dangers of untreated eating disorders. The goal is for young people to accept that all body shapes and sizes are beautiful. For example, in Northern Ohio, Youngstown State University (YSU) spreads awareness about the dangers of eating disorders by hosting a student fashion show. The show is titled the EveryBODY Fashion Show – Awareness of Eating Disorder Fashion Show and is held to showcase and celebrate all body types. The show is held in honor of a former YSU student (Danielle Peters) from the fashion merchandising program. In 2012, this student died due to complications from an eating disorder. In addition, some students take part in the National Eating Disorders Association Walk at the Cleveland Zoo to raise money for the organization.

Beyond raising awareness, people’s relationship with dieting, body weight and their sense of themselves are complex. People who suffer from eating disorders state that they still feel uncomfortable in their own skin, even after losing a substantial amount of weight. Hopefully, these individuals realize that they are chasing the illusion of perfection and start to understand that it is not possible to “diet” oneself to happiness. There are deeper issues and insecurities at work.

It is possible to fully recover from eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia. However, when a person is alone, it may feel like there is no escape from the obsessive thoughts about food and body weight. A trained healthcare professional can guide and support people as they come to terms with their perceptions and thoughts. Research shows that without proper treatment and professional assistance, the prospects for a full recovery are greatly diminished. In this case, a do it on your own approach is not the best choice.

Recovery from eating disorders can be elusive and challenging. After recovery, individuals may continue to experience mild, moderate or even severe symptoms. What is important is that people maintain an optimistic outlook. People with chronic and debilitating eating disorders can make a full recovery. With the right professional guidance and the proper level of care, it is possible for people to learn to deal with life without the nagging inner voice of an eating disorder.

Contact the friendly staff at River Centre Clinic (RCC) for additional information or questions about eating disorder treatments. Their experienced staff and nationally recognized programs provide patients with a full range of treatment options. The River Centre Clinic is located in the beautiful Sylvania, Ohio.

Follow on Twitter:  @River_Centre

Eating Disorders, College Students, Shame, Anorexia, Bulimia

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LGBTQ Youth & Eating Disorders - River Centre Clinic

Why Are Eating Disorders More Common in the LGBTQ Community?

Eating disorders have long been a problem in the United States. These disorders have been part of the psychiatric literature for many years. In recent decades, psychiatrists and other healthcare professionals have allocated more time and resources towards the study, treatment and prevention of these disorders. Recent studies are attempting to explain a particular pattern of eating disorders in U.S. society. Researchers have found that more than half of young LGBTQ people between the ages of 13 and 24 have been diagnosed with an eating disorder.

Both the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA),  and The Trevor Project, (LGBTQ suicide prevention organization) state that the report is based on online surveys of 1,034 young people. Among the 46 percent of LGBTQ youth who were surveyed and had never been diagnosed with an eating disorder, 54 percent reported that they at some point suspected they suffered from an undiagnosed eating disorder. Out of all the survey’s respondents, 75 percent said they had either been diagnosed with an eating disorder or suspected they had one at some point in their life. This research displays the need for additional studies in this area.

The most common disordered eating behavior from the survey was skipping meals and eating very little food in general. Not surprisingly, anorexia nervosa was the most prevalent eating disorder. The data also displayed a correlation between young LGBTQ individuals with eating disorders and suicide. Out of the individuals who had been diagnosed with bulimia, a shocking 96 percent had considered suicide. On a similar note, 66 percent of survey respondents who had stated that they had considered suicide already had been diagnosed with an eating disorder.

An earlier study in 2007 had explored at the prevalence of eating disorders in lesbian, gay and bisexual men and women. Part of the research examined associations between participation in the LGBTQ community and eating disorder prevalence in gay and bisexual men. The research was not clear as to why there was a high prevalence of eating disorders among gay and bisexual men. Researchers in this study found that gay and bisexual men had a significantly higher incidence of eating disorders when compared to heterosexual men.

Studies in 2007 were the first to assess DSM diagnostic categories, gay and bisexual men had a significantly higher prevalence of lifetime full syndrome bulimia, subclinical bulimia, and any subclinical eating disorder. At the time, gay men are thought to only represent 5 percent of the total male population in the United States. Yet, for males who have been diagnosed with an eating disorder, 42 percent of them identify as gay. For people who identified as gay, lesbian, bisexual or mostly heterosexual, they possessed binge eating, purging and laxative abuse rates that were much higher than their heterosexual peers. Data shows that for LGBTQ youth, as early as age 12, they are at a higher risk of engaging in disordered eating behavior.

So why is there a higher occurrence of eating disorders in the LGBTQ community?

Some researchers argue that because of stress from living as a minority, unhealthy eating habits are more common in the LGBTQ community. Eating behaviors such as binge eating and anorexia nervosa are symptoms of the general social stress that LGBTQ individuals experience as minorities. Thankfully, new studies and technology are making it easier to understand the physical impulses that surround unhealthy eating behaviors. Also, a broader acceptance of LGBTQ people in American culture should hopefully lower this statistic. The election of the first openly gay governor in Colorado shows that U.S. society is changing.

However, there are still unique stressors that people in the LGBTQ community are forced to face every day. These stressors create higher levels of anxiety and depression. This, in turn, can encourage unhealthy coping mechanisms that creates eating disorders and/or substance abuse. Some of the stressors that may encourage the development of eating disorders include:

  • Internalizing negative messages.
  • Living in fear from being harassed which can develop into PTSD.
  • Stress from discrimination.
  • Living as a runaway and/or experiencing homelessness.

Healthcare professionals who have direct experience with diagnosing and treating eating disorders can help people successfully recover from an eating disorder infliction. For additional information or questions about bulimia and anorexia, please contact the staff at River Centre Clinic (RCC). Their Eating Disorders Programs provide a full range of treatment options for both adolescents and adults. Their facility is located Northwest Ohio in the town of Sylvania, OH.

Follow on Twitter:  @River_Centre

LGBTQ, Eating Disorders, Anorexia Nervosa
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Eating disorders: From Pop Stars to Everyday People

From famous entertainers to the average person on the street, eating disorders are the silent battle that many people fight alone. Recently, pop stars like Demi Lovato and Kesha have both disclosed their struggles with eating disorders. Lovato told Insider that she is open about the challenges she faces with weight control and maintaining a positive body image. In a recent article in Cosmopolitan, Kesha shared a similar story but spoke of her success with overcoming body issues. However, there are numerous other people who do not have the spotlight of a pop star to share their pain and triumphs. They are not as well-known, but their everyday struggles with eating disorders are just as real.

Currently, there are over 30 million people who suffer from some type of eating disorder. There are still stigmas around mental illness, and this is true for eating disorders. Whether in Michigan, Iowa, or Ohio; the stories are very similar. These are stories of individuals confronting the pain of this affliction. In a story from Michigan, one woman reflects back on high school and remembers feeling proud that she “hadn’t eaten anything that day.” Eventually, she realized that something had to change. A mother in Iowa shares a similar story about her battles with and recovering from anorexia. “Eating disorders are a lot about control, and there was a lot in my life that was out of control. This was something I could control. And I grew up feeling like I wasn’t good enough or really worthy.”

In Ohio, an anorexia survivor has even created a short film that documents the doubt and isolation that is part of this mental illness. In this instance, the individual who has struggled with anorexia is a male, even though the disease is mistakenly thought of as a women’s disorder. He remembers thinking that “I could never tell people what I was going through because they never would believe me, or maybe it wasn’t even real.” His short film is intended to raise awareness and remind people that they are not alone and help is available. Recovery is possible. On a side note, males make up about 25 percent of eating disorder diagnoses.

Across the nation, eating disorders plague a wide variety of people. Yet, treatment options are available that can bring hope to those who are suffering in silence. For additional information, or if you have questions about eating disorders and recovery solutions, please contact the staff at River Centre Clinic (RCC). With decades of experience, their Eating Disorders Programs provide a full range of treatment options for adolescents and adults with a primary diagnosis of an eating disorder. The levels of care provided at the RCC are designed to meet the needs of most patients with eating disorders, but it is important to note that treatment is individualized for each case. We follow a well-established therapy model for treating eating disorders that integrates individual, group, and family therapy. The River Centre Clinic is located in a modern, spacious and tranquil setting in Sylvania, Ohio.

Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)

The EAT-26 is the most widely cited standardized self-report screening measure that may be able to help you determine if you have an eating disorder that needs professional attention. Take the EAT-26 now and get immediate and anonymous feedback.

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