Tag - Diet

Eating Disorders -- RCC

The Allure of Eating Disorders: Perfection and Shame

Some people may find this surprising, but eating disorders like anorexia nervosa and bulimia can provide individuals with a sense of purpose. They are on a mission to remake themselves and finally become happy. People suffering from an eating disorder will have an inner voice that tells them that they will be happy if they can just lose the weight. This same voice tells a person with anorexia or bulimia that their worth is primarily measured by how they physically look.

People suffering from diseases like anorexia may actually have a sense of uniqueness. As they grapple with hunger pains and thoughts that excessively focus on food, exercise and their body. They become numb to other things in their life. Eating disorders can create an anesthetic-like effect on people. When their body is perfect, they will be happy. There is simply no escape from this mission.

However, this is an illusion. For people, happiness and positive self-esteem arise from accepting and loving themselves as they are in the present. Another crucial piece for a successful recovery is for individuals to have access to love and support. In this way, people can start to understand that their eating disorder was not by choice. Yet, seeking treatment is not always an option for some people. Sadly, there is still a societal stigma towards mental health.

Due to this stigma, and feelings of shame, people may choose to struggle with their eating disorder alone. However, they should understand that there is no shame in having a diagnosed eating disorder. Perceived feelings of shame for having an eating disorder is a poor reason for not seeking professional help. But, these feelings of shame and fear create additional medical complications and high mortality rates for individuals struggling with an eating disorder.

Among the youth and college students, eating disorders are particularly a problem. There is a movement to educate students, as well as the youth in general, about body positivity and the dangers of untreated eating disorders. The goal is for young people to accept that all body shapes and sizes are beautiful. For example, in Northern Ohio, Youngstown State University (YSU) spreads awareness about the dangers of eating disorders by hosting a student fashion show. The show is titled the EveryBODY Fashion Show – Awareness of Eating Disorder Fashion Show and is held to showcase and celebrate all body types. The show is held in honor of a former YSU student (Danielle Peters) from the fashion merchandising program. In 2012, this student died due to complications from an eating disorder. In addition, some students take part in the National Eating Disorders Association Walk at the Cleveland Zoo to raise money for the organization.

Beyond raising awareness, people’s relationship with dieting, body weight and their sense of themselves are complex. People who suffer from eating disorders state that they still feel uncomfortable in their own skin, even after losing a substantial amount of weight. Hopefully, these individuals realize that they are chasing the illusion of perfection and start to understand that it is not possible to “diet” oneself to happiness. There are deeper issues and insecurities at work.

It is possible to fully recover from eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia. However, when a person is alone, it may feel like there is no escape from the obsessive thoughts about food and body weight. A trained healthcare professional can guide and support people as they come to terms with their perceptions and thoughts. Research shows that without proper treatment and professional assistance, the prospects for a full recovery are greatly diminished. In this case, a do it on your own approach is not the best choice.

Recovery from eating disorders can be elusive and challenging. After recovery, individuals may continue to experience mild, moderate or even severe symptoms. What is important is that people maintain an optimistic outlook. People with chronic and debilitating eating disorders can make a full recovery. With the right professional guidance and the proper level of care, it is possible for people to learn to deal with life without the nagging inner voice of an eating disorder.

Contact the friendly staff at River Centre Clinic (RCC) for additional information or questions about eating disorder treatments. Their experienced staff and nationally recognized programs provide patients with a full range of treatment options. The River Centre Clinic is located in the beautiful Sylvania, Ohio.

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Eating Disorders, College Students, Shame, Anorexia, Bulimia

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Scale and tape (RCC)

Body Weight and the Diet Cycle

According to research from Harvard Medical School, eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia and binge eating, afflict more than 30 million Americans, while millions more experience disordered eating and weight control behaviors. This statistic is even more sobering when one considers the fact that eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder in the United States. Numbers like these have real consequences on people’s health and overall quality of life. Often people are trapped in a vicious cycle of weight gain and severe dieting. In many instances, dieting does not produce permanent weight loss. Instead, it creates an unhealthy diet cycle where a person’s body weight quickly cycles up and down. What is needed is a holistic understanding of health that does not stigmatize body weight. People should focus on healthy behaviors and physical well-being instead of body weight.

The central idea behind the act of dieting tends to create problems. Extreme diets can actually damage people’s metabolism as well as their mental perception of food and eating. This means that individuals can end up in a worse place versus when they started the diet. The diet cycle can start here, with people’s weight gain and loss having a yo-yo appearance. The rise and fall of body weight creates the appearance that people are actually at war with their food (and weight). What is more beneficial for people is an active and healthy lifestyle, as well as an acceptance of their physical appearance and body weight.

When people are informed that they are overweight, there are unintended consequences. This information can reduce people’s satisfaction with their body and create other negative emotions and behavior. This is due to the fact that modern society tends to reinforce the message that “thin” is beautiful and good. People who struggle with their weight tend to also have lower self-esteem. The stigma of being overweight can help to set up a cycle for additional weight gain or the development of eating disorders like bulimia or anorexia. Individuals at all body weights often respond to stress and anxiety by eating. This emotional-induced eating will likely only encourage more weight gain. An increase in body weight can create a feeling of lower self-esteem and anxiety in a person. People quickly become trapped in an unhealthy feed back loop of weight gain and dieting.

More has to be done in order to make it safe to be a larger-bodied person. Most eating disorders are often accompanied by trauma, but body shaming and fat loathing only make these diseases worse. Actions from the fashion and food industry, as well as pop culture, almost seem to encourage eating disorders. However, attempts have been made to address the issues surrounding perceptions of physical imperfections, body weight and fat shaming. A few examples from fashion and marketing are from lingerie retailer Aerie and the increasing popularity of plus-size models. Since 2014, the ad campaigns of lingerie retailer Aerie (American Eagle) reportedly uses non-airbrushed photos of women of various body shapes and colors. Successful Fashion designer Chris Siriano has stated that there have “always been customers of different sizes since day one.” Currently, one half of Siriano’s fashion collection is made in extended sizes. These are positive steps in the right direction, but body weight fears and stigma surrounding fat is still a common occurrence.

For additional questions about the connection between body image, body weight and the diet cycle, contact the staff at River Centre Clinic. Their programs provide a full range of treatment options for children and adults with a primary diagnosis of an eating disorder. For immediate and confidential feedback, take River Centre Clinic’s EAT-26 (Eating Attitudes Test) assessment.

Follow us on Twitter:  @River_Centre

Body Weight, Diet Cycle

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